Local Food Infrastructure Fund: Applicant guide

Applicant guide

Purpose of this guide

This guide will:

  1. help you determine if you may be eligible for funding from Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) under the Local Food Infrastructure Fund (LFIF)
  2. provide you with directions and explanations to help you complete a program application

Table of contents

1.0 About the Local Food Infrastructure Fund

The LFIF is a 5-year, $60-million initiative ending March 31, 2024. It was created as part of the Government of Canada's Food Policy for a healthier and more sustainable food system in Canada. Food systems have direct impacts on the lives of Canadians. The social, health, environmental, and economic components of food systems are interdependent and are integral to the well-being of communities.

The fund supports community-based, not-for-profit organizations in creating or improving their food systems through investments in infrastructure that directly relate to addressing food insecurities and increasing the accessibility of healthy, nutritious and local foods within their community.

This phase of LFIF is a targeted call for applicants from:

  • small cities or rural areas
  • isolated communities
  • Indigenous (First Nations, Métis and Inuit) groups (urban and rural)

Applicants must have a mission to establish and/or expand their local food system to reduce food insecurity. Through the creation, expansion and/or completion of a food system, recipient organizations will:

  • improve access to safe, healthy and culturally relevant food while promoting community development
  • improve health outcomes for Canadians most at risk of food insecurity
  • promote environmentally sustainable food systems

The fund is designed to create or foster connections within food systems by enabling organizations to partner with other communities, the private sector, academia and other organizations to collectively strengthen local food systems and address food insecurity in a sustainable manner. Through these connections, community partnerships will be able to promote integrated food system solutions that enhance the social, health, and environmental benefits in a particular area.

1.1 Eligible applicants

This fund is targeted only to applicants who fall within at least one (1) of the following categories:

  • Located in rural communities (population under 1,000) or small cities (population between 1,000-29,999)
  • Indigenous groups in either urban centres or rural areas (for example, Indigenous governments/communities, Indigenous not-for-profit organizations).

Also, eligible applicants must:

  • have a mission to reduce food insecurity
  • be a legal entity, capable of entering into a legally-binding agreement
  • consist of a(n)
    • Indigenous groupEndnote 1 (for example, not-for-profit organization, government or community)
    • community or charitable organization (for example not-for-profit organization)
    • not-for-profit co-operative; or
    • municipality (population under 30,000)Endnote 2

The applicant is required to provide proof of legal entity and not-for-profit status, such as Certificates and Articles of Incorporation, a constitution document, etc. These documents must be issued and filed, respectively, by or with a provincial, territorial or federal government, or an Indigenous Band Council, documenting the Applicant's status as a legal entity.

Note: organizations must have been in operation for at least 2 years as a legal entity, by their LFIF application submission date.

Eligible applicants must provide a clear and comprehensive history of their organization as well as details, supported with metrics, of the clients they currently serve through their food services, the activities currently conducted and the partners that are currently involved in these activities.

More details on how to complete the application form can be found in Annex A.

1.2 Eligible projects

Eligible projects must create 2 or more new food system components with the goal to create, expand and/or complete your community's food system. Projects must be infrastructure-specific, community-driven, and dedicated to improving access to healthy, nutritious and local foods for Canadians at risk of food insecurity (refer to eligible costs).

A food system consists of:

  • a supply chain (production, processing, distribution, consumption, waste disposal)
  • all the elements that support this supply chain (environment, people, inputs, processes, infrastructures, institutions, etc.)
  • the outputs/impacts (social, health, environmental and economic outcomes)

This fund aims to increase the resiliency of these food systems at the local level, making them more socially, environmentally and economically sustainable.

LFIF recognizes that localized food systems have their own unique characteristics and constraints. A local food system component includes:

  • Production (could include the following elements, but is not limited to)
    • growing
    • harvesting
    • traditional methods of gathering food (such as plants, animals)
    • food forests
    • green energy systems (such as solar panels)
    • irrigation systems (such as well, rain barrels, water catchment basin)
  • Processing (could include the following elements, but is not limited to)
    • traditional methods of transforming food
    • cooking/baking
    • canning
    • smoking
    • dehydration/drying
    • preservation
    • butchering
  • Distribution (could include the following elements, but is not limited to)
    • storage
    • packaging
    • transportation
  • Consumption (could include the following element, but is not limited to)
    • dining and serving infrastructure for community meals
  • Waste disposal (could include the following elements, but is not limited to)
    • composting
    • food loss and food waste reduction
    • eco-friendly food packaging
  • Economic Development and Sustainability

Projects must create a minimum of 2 new food system components.

A successful food system requires multiple partnerships and engagement from the private sector, academia, and/or other organizations and communities.

Details must be provided on:

  • what the proposed project aims to achieve
  • who will benefit from the project
  • how the project and requested infrastructure will be used to address food insecurity in at-risk populations
  • how the project will increase the availability, access, and distribution of healthy, nutritious and local food
  • how the project will integrate into and strengthen the local food system
  • how the project will impact the well-being of community members

As well, the application must detail existing and future partnerships designed to strengthen local food systems and address food insecurity in a sustainable manner.

Also, a table of metrics must be completed to demonstrate the current food system status and the application's outcomes/impacts (for example, number of at-risk people served will increase from 100 to 150 per week, or the amount of food produced will increase from 200 kilograms to 400 kilograms per month).

More details on how to complete the application form can be found in Annex A.

The objective of this fund is to address food insecurity in a sustainable manner. Although no profitsEndnote 3 should be derived from the activities undertaken through this fund, any revenuesEndnote 4 generated must be reinvested into sustaining the local food system.

1.2.1 Example of a food system
Description of this image follows.
Figure A: Example of a partial food system prior to LFIF funding
Description of above image

Production

  • Blueberry fields
  • Livestock
  • Fishing

Processing and Distribution

  • High costs to process and transport food

Consumption and Waste Disposal

  • Food insecure community members

Economic Development and Sustainability

Description of this image follows.
Figure B: Example of a stronger food system funded through LFIF
Description of above image

Production

  • Blueberry fields
  • Irrigation systems
  • Food forest
  • Livestock
  • Community gardens
  • Hunting
  • Greenhouse
  • Hunting/fishing vehicles

Processing and Distribution

  • Lower costs to process and transport food
  • Slaughter/butcher equipment
  • Community kitchen
  • Cold storage
  • Refrigerated vehicles

Consumption and Waste Disposal

  • Free food for food insecure community members
  • Free community feasts
  • Composting

Economic Development and Sustainability

  • Teach younger generations
  • Community education
  • Revenue from farmers markets
  • Partnerships
  • Reinvest into food system

Current state of the local food system:

  • Blueberry fields: grow, harvest, process, and sell blueberries and processed blueberry products to community members and neighbouring communities
  • Small bison herd and chicken flock: high cost to process meat as animals need to be transported to a different town in order to be slaughtered/butchered
  • Fishing: community members participate in hunting/fishing and share it with community members, but with limited cold storage this can only occur occasionally and up to the limits of individuals' cold storage capacities

Infrastructure that could be requested to strengthen this local food system:

  • Greenhouse
  • Gardens and fencing
  • Irrigation system for blueberry fields
  • Food forest of edible plants
  • Slaughtering and butchering equipment
  • Kitchen equipment/appliances
  • Smokehouse
  • Fridges and freezers
  • Refrigerated truck
  • Snowmobile and boat for hunting/fishing
  • Composting equipment

Example of a stronger food system:

  • Production:
    • Irrigation system for the blueberry fields improves crop yield and frees up time from individuals who were responsible for watering the fields
    • Gardens will be planted at the school in order to get children interested in healthy food production at a young age
    • Greenhouse will extend the growing season for vegetables
    • Food forest allows community access to various edible plants on a seasonal basis
    • Snowmobile and boat will increase capacity for hunting/fishing
    • Increased meat from hunting/fishing will allow for more to be shared with community members most at risk of food insecurity
  • Processing:
    • New slaughtering and butchering equipment reduces the cost of processing meat from the bison herd and chicken flock, as well as from hunting/fishing. This results in lower costs of meat for community members
    • Outfitting a community kitchen housed in the community centre, as well as nearby smokehouse, increase the capacity and diversity of food processing
    • Cold storage (fridges and freezers) allows for more fresh/frozen food to be stored for community members to access
  • Distribution:
    • Refrigerated truck will allow the transportation of surplus food to be shared or sold and delivered to neighbouring communities
  • Consumption and waste disposal:
    • Monthly community feasts for everyone, as well as weekly meals for Elders and senior members of the community, will be prepared in the newly equipped kitchen facility and provided for free to community members at the community centre. This will also facilitate social interaction and awareness of the improvements to the local food system
    • Community members at risk of food insecurity will have increased access to culturally appropriate food
    • Composting equipment allows food and crop waste to be used to grow more crops
  • Local economic development and sustainability:
    • Feeding community members is the primary focus, but once this has been accomplished, surplus (local, healthy) foods are sold at a reduced price to neighbouring communities. Any revenues are invested back into running the food system, maintaining infrastructure, subsidizing salaries to those working within food system, etc.
    • Hunting/fishing, gardening, and food processing techniques (both contemporary and traditional methods) will be taught to the younger generations and to any community members interested in learning

1.3 Eligible costs

The following section demonstrates the eligible and ineligible costs under this program and any limitations or instructions you need to know to help you complete your budget.

Notes:

  • All eligible infrastructure must directly relate to addressing food insecurities through the creation, expansion and/or completion of your community's food system
  • Ownership of eligible infrastructure must be maintained for a minimum of 2 years after the completion of the project
  • If you do not own the land and/or building on which you are installing the requested infrastructure, you will be required to provide a permission letter from the owner of the building/property indicating permission to carry out the project
Capital assets
Eligible cost items
  • The purchase of new or used equipment
  • Alteration or modernization of an asset that appreciably prolongs the period of usefulness of the item, or improves its functionality

Examples of capital assets specific to this program:

  • Refrigerators/freezers
  • Food transportation (such as, refrigerated trucks/trailers or cargo/cube trucks)
  • Equipment for traditional food gathering (for example, fishing equipment, non-fur trapping equipment, ATV, snowmobiles, small watercraft, ice fishing huts)
  • Food processing equipment (for example, reusable canning supplies, meat grinder, smokers, dehydrators)
  • Renovations of existing facilities to install new infrastructure that directly addresses food insecurity
  • Cold storage/shelving/forklift
  • Greenhouses
  • Smokehouses and root cellars
  • Gardening infrastructure on small or large scale (for example, community gardens, established urban farms)
    • Garden boxes, tractors, gardening-specific tools, composting equipment, pollination tools/pollinators
  • Hydroponics (for example, growing towers, lighting, aquaponics)
  • Green infrastructure, (for example, edible trees and plants for food forests)
  • Plant-watering infrastructure (irrigation systems/rain water capture/wells)
  • Outfitting a community kitchen (including cutlery, chairs, tables, etc.) directly related to addressing food insecurity
Ineligible costs and limitations
Ineligible costs
  • Purchase or lease of land or buildings
  • Purchase or construction of any buildings including sheds, food stands, storage facilities, community centres, etc.
  • Purchase or lease of private/personal vehicles (for example, mini vans or pickup trucks)
  • Contingency funds
  • The lease of any infrastructure
  • Medicinal plants
  • Livestock
  • Air conditioning/heating units
  • Emergency generators
  • Computer equipment (for example, desktops, tablets, phones)
  • Data entry
Ineligible limitations
  • Initial purchase/costs only for green infrastructure (such as seeds, soil and compost)
  • Solar panels (only if related to food infrastructure)
  • Digital systems (for example, software development for production and/or distribution platforms including beta testing) (only if related to food infrastructure)
Other direct project costs
Eligible cost items

Project costs associated with the completion of the project such as:

  • Installation costs
  • Freight charges
  • Shipping costs
  • Duties
  • Labour costs for the purpose of installing requested infrastructure
Ineligible costs and limitations
  • The purchase of perishable and/or non-perishable food
  • Gift cards
  • Structural renovations not specific to the project
  • Costs associated with ongoing operations (for example, labour, staff, rent, insurance, utilities)
  • Administrative support or project management
  • Engineering/Architectural plans or permit fees
  • Provincial sales taxes, GST/HST or other value added taxes
  • Costs related to marketing activities and business promotion
  • Costs for activities intended to directly influence/lobby governments
  • Hospitality costs
  • Travel costs
  • Costs to prepare the application and negotiate the agreement
  • Other costs not specifically required for the project
Quotes

A quote from a third-party supplier must be submitted for every item costing more than $5,000. These quotes or estimates must include a category breakdown (enumerate all items per cost item) for all capital assets or other direct project costs to be purchased and installed and must have been issued no earlier than January 15, 2022. Ensure the quoted amounts (exclusive of taxes) are used when filling out the budget.

Quotes must be provided either on supplier letterhead or as a screenshot from the supplier's website (screenshot must include website URL, itemized list and totals). Note that quotes from non-commercial vendors for private sales will not be accepted (for example, Kijiji, Auto Trader). In addition, unofficial quotes in the form of Word documents or Excel spreadsheets will not be accepted. Quotes that do not comply will not be considered.

Retroactive costs

Costs may be retroactively covered only to the date you receive an email from the program confirming that your application has been deemed complete. Incurring costs before a project decision and until an agreement is fully executed between AAFC and your organization is a risk as these costs may be deemed ineligible under the agreement.

1.4 Funding and cost sharing

Funding

Applicants under this program will be eligible to receive a minimum of $100,000 and up to $500,000 in grant funding. If you previously applied to LFIF, you are eligible to apply to this intake. However, applicants may only submit one application to the current intake.

Successful applicants are required to enter into a legally-binding agreement with AAFC.

Funds will flow over the course of 2 fiscal years, in 2 instalments:

  • 1st instalment (fiscal year 2022-23): 50% of funding payable upon signing of the Agreement by both parties
  • 2nd instalment (fiscal year 2023-24): 50% of funding payable in the Spring of 2023
Cost sharing

Eligible project costs will be shared between AAFC, the applicant and/or funding partners. The cost share ratio will be a maximum of 75% from AAFC and a minimum of 25% from the applicant and/or partner contributions. Priority will be given to projects that demonstrate strong partnerships with other sections of the food supply chain and/or demonstrate community engagement, high impact and an ability to mobilize multiple resources.

Other funding sources can be from:

  • the applicant
  • non-governmental organizations:
    • industry associations and networks
    • businesses
    • academia
    • not-for-profit organizations
    • Indigenous groups
  • government:

All contributions from other funding sources must be towards eligible costs in order to be included in the budget. If contributions are towards ineligible items, they may be mentioned in the overall project description but must not be included in the budget.

2.0 Expected results

The project is expected to create, expand and/or complete food systems, enabling them to be resilient, integrated and sustainable, and to facilitate access to healthy, nutritious and local foods for at-risk populations.

The project is also expected to demonstrate how it integrates and strengthens the local food system, and how it impacts the wellbeing of community members. It is also expected that as organizations make increased investments in food-related infrastructure, their capacity to provide healthy, nutritious and local foods within their community(ies) will increase.

2.1 Sustainability

A sustainable food system is one that offers food security and nutrition for the community and future generations. This means that the food system:

  • ensures economic sustainability
  • has broad-based benefits for society (social sustainability)
  • aims to have a positive or neutral impact on the natural environment (environmental sustainability)

The Program recognizes that each community's food system will be different. To help you develop your food system, application form questions are available below. The answers you provide should help you plan how your project will survive in the long term and how it will enable you to identify challenges and opportunities for creating a self-sustaining food system. You may not be able to address all aspects in the current and short-term columns; however, you should have a long-term plan in place to achieve all sustainability aspects. If any aspect is not applicable to your project, you will be expected to provide details as to why.

Food insecurity
Current state Short-term plan (within the grant period) Long-term plan (beyond the grant period)
Describe how you currently address food insecurity for at-risk populations within your community. How will the requested infrastructure increase your ability to address food insecurity within your community? How will your food system address food insecurity in your community in the long term?
Food system components
Current state Short-term plan (within the grant period) Long-term plan (beyond the grant period)
Describe which food system components, if any, are already in place within your community? Describe which 2 new food system components you are adding to your local food system with the requested infrastructure? Moving forward, how do you plan on completing your local food system?

Note: Different components of the local food system can be provided through partnerships.

Economic sustainability
  Current state Short-term plan (within the grant period) Long-term plan (beyond the grant period)
Economic development[1] If your current food system is generating revenues, describe how this occurs and how revenues are used? How do you plan to generate revenues and how will you reinvest them back into the food system? How do you plan to maintain/increase the generation of revenues and how will you reinvest them back into the food system in the long term?
Partnerships[2] Which partners/ stakeholders, if any, are engaged in your current food system? Please describe. Detail the existing and new partnerships necessary to implement the proposed food system components and how the partners will be involved. How do you plan to ensure an appropriate level of partner/stakeholder engagement in your food system in the long term? How will you identify new potential partners/ stakeholders and address any loss of engagement?

Notes:

  1. Profits are defined as any revenues remaining after settling all expenses needed to sustain an activity. Revenues are defined as the total income produced by a given source.
  2. A successful food system requires multiple partnerships and engagement from the private sector, academia, other organizations and communities.
Social sustainability
  Current state Short-term plan (within the grant period) Long-term plan (beyond the grant period)
Community engagement[1] How are your community members participating in your current food system? How will you engage community members in supporting the creation, expansion and/or completion of your local food system project? How will you maintain involvement of community members in the food system and address any loss of engagement?
Education and training[2] Which educational/training elements, if any, are included in your current food system? Which educational/training elements, if any, will be included in your food system project? How will you build/expand educational/training elements into your food system?

Notes:

  1. For example, elders, professionals, tradespeople, volunteers.
  2. For example, sharing community expertise, farming practices, traditional Indigenous gathering, farming and production practices, food literacy, school involvement
Environmental sustainability
  Current state Short-term plan (within the grant period) Long-term plan (beyond the grant period)
Food loss and food waste[1] Are you currently addressing food loss and food waste within your community? If so, how? How will you address food loss and food waste in your food system project, if applicable? What additional/ complementary methods, if any, will you implement to address food loss and food waste?
Green practices[2] Which, if any, green practices are utilized in your current community's food system? How will your project bring additional green practices to your community's food system, if applicable? Which additional green practices will you build into your community's food system?

Notes:

  1. For example, food transformation, composting, community education
  2. For example, holistic/ permaculture approach, green energy, eco-friendly appliances, transportation

3.0 Assessment processEndnote 6

Applications will be evaluated based on the clarity, merit and the extent to which they also meet the following criteria:

Food insecurity
Capacity of the project to address food insecurity in the community (such as, fills an identified food-related need, increases the number of beneficiaries, increases distribution of food)
Food system components
Creation of two new food system components and their integration within existing food system components
Economic development
Capacity to generate revenues that are reinvested into the local food system
Partnerships
Creation and maintenance of partnerships that contribute financially to support the implementation and operation of the food system
Community engagement
Mobilization of the community through concrete participation of community members in the implementation and operation of the food system
Education/training
Education and training opportunities that relate to food insecurity (introduces a new way of addressing food security, knowledge sharing amongst community members)
Food loss and food waste
Addresses food loss and food waste (develops new ways to utilize food, avoid waste, etc.)
Green practices
Implementation of environmentally-friendly practices for addressing food insecurity (implements innovative and sustainable practices)

4.0 Reporting requirements

Recipients will be required to report on results achieved. A final performance report must be submitted by September 30, 2024.

Performance and results reports

The final report should include the following:

Performance measures[1] Brief description

Degree to which the Recipient has increased its capacity to provide healthy and nutritious food as a result of the project

Note: increased capacity is defined as improved level of service, increased service efficiency, expanded / scale-up of services, increased number of service offerings, increased number of partnerships, etc.

The Recipient will be asked to provide an assessment on a numeric scale of the level of change regarding its capacity to provide healthy and nutritious food.
Percentage change in Recipient's capacity to provide healthy and nutritious food The Recipient will be asked to quantify some elements of capacity (for example, number of services offered, number of partnerships) both before and after the project.
Degree to which healthy and nutritious food availability has increased in communities as a result of the project The Recipient will be asked to provide an assessment on a numeric scale of the level of change regarding the availability of healthy and nutritious food in the targeted community(ies).
Percentage change in the amount of food produced/ distributed by program recipients The Recipient will be asked to report on the quantities of food that it produces/distributes to its clientele, both before and after the project.
Perceived decrease in the level of food insecurity in the communities served by the Recipient as a result of the project

Recipient's perception of how the project has helped decrease the level of food insecurity in the communities served. The Recipient will be asked to provide an assessment on a numeric scale to support this, in addition to qualitative information.

Recipients will be required to administer a survey of their project's ultimate beneficiaries. A survey template will be provided by the Minister.

Note:

  1. Performance measures are subject to change at the discretion of the Minister.

Other reports may be required at AAFC's discretion.

5.0 Environmental considerations

AAFC must comply with the Impact Assessment Act (IAA). If a proposal is in relation to a "project" on federal land, then the IAA might apply. See Annex A for more information.

6.0 M-30 Act (for Quebec-based applicants)

The Province of Quebec's M-30 legislation may apply to Quebec-based applicants only. It is the Act Respecting the Ministère du Conseil exécutif (R.S.Q., c. M-30). More information is available online, by contacting the department from which you receive the majority of your funding or by contacting the Ministère de l'Agriculture, des Pêcheries et de l'Alimentation du Québec at dpci@mapaq.gouv.qc.ca.

M-30 applies to various types of Quebec organizations. For example, organizations located in Quebec and receiving more than half of their financing from the Government of Quebec may be subject to the Act. When inquiring as to whether or not your organization is subject to this Act, you will need to provide your most recent financial statements and letters of patent (if applicable).

All Quebec based organizations who are subject to the Act will have to obtain a ministerial order from the Secrétariat du Québec aux relations canadiennes (SQRC) prior to entering into an agreement with AAFC.

7.0 How to apply

Due to limited funding, applications will only be accepted starting June 1, 2022 up to July 22, 2022. Applicants may submit an application for a minimum ask of $100,000 to a maximum ask of $500,000. Project activities must be completed by March 31, 2024.

The following checklist is available to help you prepare for your application. For more information on how to complete a project application, refer to Annex A.

Application checklist

Before you submit your Project Application Form, use the following checklist to help ensure your application is complete. Only complete applications will be assessed.

  • Your organization is an eligible organization type (see Section 1.1).
  • Your organization has been in operation for at least 2 years.
  • Your proposed project will augment your organization's ability to address food insecurity through the creation, expansion and/or completion of food systems in your community.
  • Each section of the Project Application Form has been completed.
  • Only eligible costs are included in the proposed budget and reflected in the contributions from AAFC, the applicant organization and any other source of funding.
  • You have clicked on the "Check for Errors" button in the upper right corner of each page of the Application Form to ensure that it has been completed correctly.
  • You have attached all of the following documents as applicable:
    • Confirmation of legal entity and not-for-profit status (such as Articles of Incorporation or Certificates of Incorporation). Note that Indigenous governments and municipalities do not need to provide confirmation of legal entity.
    • Table of Metrics
    • Letters of Financial Support
    • Project Engagement letters
    • Permission letter(s) from the owner(s) of the building/property
    • Quotes from third party suppliers for budget items costing $5,000 or more

Checklist notes

Letters of Financial Support must respond to the following points to outline the contribution to the project:

  • Detail the specific amount of cash or in-kind committed towards eligible costs, broken down by fiscal year (if applicable)
  • Describe the purpose of the contribution (that is, is the contribution for a specific project cost or towards the overall project?)

Project engagement letters must outline the non-financial support of community members and organizations.

If you do not own the land and/or building on which you are installing the requested infrastructure, you will be required to provide a permission letter from the owner of the building/property indicating permission to carry out the project. The permission letter must include the following information:

  • Explicit permission to carry out the project (including any installation of requested infrastructure)
  • the duration of the lease
  • If not leased or owned, provide proof of long-term commitment for use of the land/space

If the infrastructure is being installed in multiple locations, you must provide permission letters from each owner.

Confidentiality

It is the applicant's responsibility to identify if information contained in an application is considered commercially confidential. This information will not be disclosed unless required by law, including the Access to Information Act, or upon express authorization of the applicant.

8.0 After you apply

Once your application has been submitted, an acknowledgment notice will be sent to you.

After an application has been received, AAFC verifies that all required forms and declarations have been completed and there is sufficient detail in the application for a full assessment.

When the application has been deemed complete and ready for assessment, notice will be provided to the applicant. Service standards for assessments only begin once the application is deemed to be complete.

Service standards

Once you submit an application, the program's goal is to achieve our service standards a minimum of 80% of the time. Under normal circumstances the program will:

  • Respond to general inquiries made to our phone number or email address before the end of the next business day
  • Acknowledge receipt of applications within one (1) business day
  • Assess applications and send approval or a rejection notification letter within 100 business days after the application has been deemed complete

Please be advised that even if a project meets all eligibility criteria, the submission of an application creates no obligation on the part of the Minister or of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada officials to approve and provide funding for the proposed project. The Minister retains discretion to determine, based on other public policy and public interest considerations, whether an application that meets the criteria identified in this guide will ultimately receive funding.

9.0 Contact information

For more information, please contact the program by:

E-mail: aafc.foodprograms-programmesalimentaires.aac@agr.gc.ca
Telephone: 1-877-246-4682
TDD/TTY: 613-773-2600

Mail:
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada
Local Food Infrastructure Fund
1341 Baseline Road
Tower 7, Floor 8, Room 223
Ottawa, ON K1A 0C5